Guarapachangueo

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Postby TONE74 » Sat Aug 11, 2007 1:59 pm

Anybody out there has a guarapachangueo pattern they are willing to share? or knows an online source for one. I checked the youtube Panga one but I can't make out all the strokes ( I get confused after the 8th ) and I want to make sure I learn it correctly. If you guys know this one I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPVbENbeRnw
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Postby windhorse » Sat Aug 11, 2007 3:26 pm

This is Guarapachangueo with three tumba variants.

clave: | X - - X - - - X | - - X - X - - - ||
lobox: | t - t t - t b b | B - - - - - - - ||
conga: | - m m m - t b b | b - t o - o - s ||
tumba: | o - t o - t b b | b - t b - t b - ||
tumba: | s - t s - t b b | b - t b - t b - ||
tumba: | s - t s - t b b | b - t s - b - t ||

This one is the Munequitos version when they played it on Vacunau
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Postby TONE74 » Sat Aug 11, 2007 8:23 pm

Thanks Windhorse. I don't understand how to read it though. Is the conga part always the same and the tumba part changes to either of the three. Also I'm guessing its for more than one player or is it a 2 drum pattern. Thanks
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Postby windhorse » Sun Aug 12, 2007 4:14 pm

It's one drum per player.
I've also got a 2 drum version practice pattern of this one up on my
block notation page.

The way we play that tumba part is to go back and forth between that first one and the third one, to make the entire phrase two claves long. So, for one clave, the tumba starts with tones, then on the next one it's slaps. There are more variations, but of course much gets lost in translations.
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Postby TONE74 » Fri Aug 17, 2007 1:09 pm

OK, I broke the Panga (top post) pattern down. I ended up with 22 strokes went over it a few times and this seems to be it. Is this wrong because there are supposed to be 16 per clave. This pattern is interesting though it goes around and then back again with the Tumba on the 1 -2 of the clave. Maybe its 24 strokes. It was really easy to learn once I broke it down. I'm digging it, it doesn't sound as repetitive as other patterns I have learned. Peace
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Postby blango » Fri Aug 17, 2007 3:51 pm

Windhorse,

i love that track! but for me, it is a bit of a busy version.

i would use the tumba var. and the muffs on segunda sparingly :;):

peace,

Tony
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Postby TONE74 » Fri Aug 24, 2007 11:29 am

Whats up everybody, can anyone tell me if any books have been written with patterns on this rythym. I got the Panga one down and I want to add to it but I cant find anything that blends well. I've read that people have different versions. I'm hooked on it right now my only option is the Panga in Japan video which is difficult to break down.
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Postby gilbert » Sat Aug 25, 2007 10:13 am

i learned the rythm from the dvd Rumba in the park by raul rekow and karl perrazo
check it out
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Postby JayMacho » Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:23 am

There are alot of different ways to play guarapachangueo. But basically, its played with the ponche on the one. Everything else comes from there. On tumba I like the style thats played on the bombo or two beat of the clave. Rumberos de Cuba play this tumba style. Check out the Chinitos method on my myspace page.

http://www.myspace.com/jaysonmacho
La Llave es la Clave!
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Postby davidpenalosa » Sun Sep 02, 2007 11:44 pm

Hi Jay,
Can you please define "ponche" as you used it in your last post? Thanks.
-David




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Postby windhorse » Mon Sep 03, 2007 1:59 pm

Yeah, I thought about saying something too, but I figured he must mean where the tones stand out.
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Postby JayMacho » Tue Sep 04, 2007 1:59 am

Sorry, ponche is a bass tone. And its also played on the third beat of the clave, like when playing tres golpe. Farinas did an album with Ecue Tumba playing this style on cajon. They sell it on itunes if interested.

JAY
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Postby davidpenalosa » Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:14 am

Jay,
Sorry, I'm still having some trouble understanding. I'm familiar with the term "ponche" to mean the third stroke of tresillo:

X..X..P.

P = ponche
X = other tresillo strokes

That means it's also the third stroke of son clave:

X..X..P...X.X...

P = ponche
X = other clave strokes

Is this how you are using the term too, or are you identifying a part, like when we say "salidor"?
-David
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Postby TONE74 » Tue Sep 04, 2007 11:26 am

How often is the accent on the bombo used? I know its normal to use in regular guaguanco can I add it to guarapachangueo also what other rumba is it used in.
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Postby jorge » Tue Sep 04, 2007 4:46 pm

Do you mean the second stroke of the son clave? Seems to me that the third stroke of the son clave is where the bongo hembra or the conga tone go in son or salsa, ie, the 4th beat of the first 4/4 measure of the clave.

ie, in David's notation:

X..P..X...X.X...

The second stroke of the son (or rumba) clave is what some people call the bombo, that is where we generally hit the bass on the tres dos and/or tumbador in most rumbas. If I am understanding this correctly, this is what JayMacho is calling the ponche.

In some of the guarapachangueos I have heard (eg, some of the songs on Rapsodia Rumbera or Rumberos de Cuba: Habana de mi Corazon), the tumbador cajon is all about what Tone74 is calling the bombo (beat, not instrument). The tumbador cajon is accenting that beat on both measures of the clave, rather than playing the standard tumbador part for the guaguanco.

in David's notation, what he is calling tresillos:

X..P..X.X..P..X.

or

X..P..X.X..T..X.

where T is a tone on the cajon, P is a bass, . is a rest, and X is soft stroke with the right hand (for right handed player). The left hand is not shown.




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