Tips of the Pros - .. who does what, when and how ...

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Re: Tips of the Pros - .. who does what, when and how ...

Postby willie55 » Sun Jan 30, 2011 2:41 pm

keep it simply and to the point. if in depth explanation is needed than link to it, so that the tips could be read or seen within a 5 min time frame. if needed build up 1 of 5, 2 of 5 etc.
keep to the instrument in the tip do not go off on tangents. on videos make sure audio is clear and right volume. try to keep overtones and echos out, so make sure your room thouat the video is taken in is appropriate, if possible start series with a definitions or vocabulary page that viewers of videos can refer to. link this page to the video page. when posting questions to a tip or video refer to the tip in question an not a random thought. adman see if it is possible to archive FAQ of a tip or video and link that archive to it. NO RANDOM DEBATES among PROS, just because it is not the way you do it, does not make it wrong. because it is working for the PRO who posted it. LOVE PEACE HEALTH AND HAPPINESS to all who will be participating in the adventure and to us who will be reading and viewing. A PRO in a minimum sense is: if you get paid to perform and a audience is appreciative of your work, you do it more than once, are recognized by some media or other musicians to perform with them. if you get $500 to $1000 for a days entertainment fee, you are a PRO
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Re: Tips of the Pros - .. who does what, when and how ...

Postby Ernesto Pediangco » Wed Feb 09, 2011 5:13 am

Ernesto Pediangco offers a tip : Bacterial lives on your hand drums, so why do you never clean the heads with anti bacterial soap or solutions ? Have you ever seen the black gunk that accumulates on frequently played hand drums ? YUK ! Imagine a fungus that can be ground into your hands from playing someone eles funky drum ? It sounds nasty but we must be made aware of this issue. My drum heads are always cleaned regularly & if I play some one elses hand drums, I will wash my hands quickly as possible. Keeping the heads clean also keeps the heads free of gunk that moisture condenses on and soaks into the fibers of natural heads & skins. If you use hand lotions on your hands, the oils & chemicals will also accumulate along with the oils, loisture & free radicals that sweat out of your hands. ( Free radicals ~ I got that term from a James Bond Movie :) Simple dish soap or better yet, an anti bacterial soap on a moist sponge or wash cloth will removed the gunk and you should quickly towel dry the areas you washed. It will not harm your heads unless it is a thin bongo head and you actualy soak it for a long length of time. Since you are cleaning your drums, I suggest you use a simple automotive wax to seal the metal,wood, or fiberglass from moisture and as you rub off the excess wax, you also remove grundgy smudges and little scuffs so your drums & hard wares are attractive & less prone to oxidation & sun bleached damage. The wax also helps keep the adhesives from finger tape from becoming hard to simply rub off. I dont care if all you have is wet wipes to clean your drums, as long as I do not share the funk on your drum heads lol. :)
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Re: Tips of the Pros - .. who does what, when and how ...

Postby Ernesto Pediangco » Wed Feb 09, 2011 5:54 am

Tips from Ernesto for beginners of Latin Drum Section: Unless you are from a community where many acessible latin Drummers can school you on how a 3 or more piece Latin Drum & Percussion section functions as a team, you can be easily confused & unaware of the layered fabric that is knit into a rhythm by Congas, w/ Bongos, w/Maracas & Guiro, w/ Timbales & the various cow bells used. This basic section was created as the evolution of the Latin drum & rhythm section was invented in the New World, In Cuba & was adapted by Puerto Rican & New York musicians as well as other Latin American cultures which had differing cultural roots. Just as the contemporary drumset was a North American invention born from vaudville stages & silent movie sound track bands performing in movie theaters and needing one drummer to play several percussion roles, The Latin drum & percussion section was an evolution of social dance orchestras, street drumming ( rumba ) and various folkloric musical genres with both African & European roots. While the entertainment oriented bands began shifting towards a single conga player playing 2 or more congas / tumbadoras, and the role of Tympani was redefined as timbales became more practical and the use of Bongos added to the congas as an addlib & soloing drum, various playing styles and particular associated hand percussions were added to create a layered & dynamic drum / percussion ensemble. Remember...this was all a product of African culture fusing with Colonial European cultures to create something unique in the Americas. Before the concepts of Jazz were defined, Cuban & Puerto Rican & other Latin American music cultures were a few hundred years evolved already & was improvisational since its African roots. This was a new concept in western cultured music. Now, the Latin section is being further evolved by intergarting American drumset applications & the congas are becoming more add libish as if in compitition with bongos & timbales. Some of this is tasty & creative & much is done out of ignorance and selfishness. The OLD School methods are the fundamental ones that are more clearly defined and very musicaly developed since Cuban folkloric styles, the Mambo / Cha Cha Cha days and the Salsa era born in New York & Puerto Rico. Its still Cuban in essence, but is a separate path of growth & experimentation. Way to much to describe in detail in print form or any other media, It is just to rich of an art form for that. But...many owners of Latin drums, do not intentionaly seek out the heritage of where these drums and music styles come from & how it developed. Just as important as the technical methodology of drumming, is the heritage of the cultures from which they derive. This is where the tastiness of musicianmanship comes through, not in technical razzle dazzle ! I suggest all drummers to study the roots & musical innovations of Latin drumming. The future of music is certainly going to be more increasingly, cross cultural and the richness of Latin music will be a major influence ! .....To be continued....Ernesto Pediangco 2/8/2011
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Re: Tips of the Pros - .. who does what, when and how ...

Postby premel » Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:58 pm

a pro is also .. this kid that you find inthe midle of a ceremonie in africa .. and that kick's your mind of the ground and let's you know that you still have a lot to learn... but .... he does too .. !!! 8) all and all ... it's a life long process like any work .. xthat want's to be well done .. theyre is no greater percussionnist then another .. just different form's...and style's..and of course ... languages.. and improve technic's... you creat your style.. with a numerous styles of others ... !!!play and learn... everywhere... 8)
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Re: Tips of the Pros - .. who does what, when and how ...

Postby vxla » Fri Jul 22, 2011 6:46 pm

Thank you for your comments, Ernesto. Please keep them coming.
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